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Thread: Brake shoes for dummies

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Springdale, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,431

    Default Brake shoes for dummies

    Okay, I'm talking about my left side (drivers side) brake shoes, front and rear axles.
    Okay, there are long and short linings on the shoes, I know that. There is one shoe facing forward and one facing backwards.
    Now here's the question;

    I found the front wheel shoes with the short lining'd shoe on the rear, long on the front.

    On the rear axle I found the short lining'd shoe on the front and the long on the rear.

    They were basically 180* out from each other, were they installed wrong?
    If so, what is the correct way/sequence to mount them. Remember, please dont get too wordy, I can do it if it's kept as simple as possible. Thanks a load in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    west central wisconsin
    Posts
    314

    Default

    Usuaully short in front long on back,I'm not sure about the 715 tho.

    DJ

  3. #3

    Default

    Like Dave says. Short to the front and long on the back. On the right side the star wheel is next to the secondary shoe (long shoe). On the left side the star wheel is towards the primary shoe (short shoe). Also make sure the arrow on the brake self-centering anchor block points to the front of the vehicle.

    For those who have relined shoes, the linings are usually the same length so position doesn't matter.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Springdale, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,431

    Default

    Verrry Cool. Thanks, y'all. Short to front, long in the back. Wonder how much difference it made having them reversed on that front wheel?
    Last night I had to take the plate down to mount the rear wheel cyl. I also broke 3 grinding bits on my dremel opening up the holes. That mounting plate is thick!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhoadesville, Virginia (five miles from no place)
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    Short in front is always the rule on every vehicle I have been into. By reversing the shoes, I have noticed there is less "grab" when the brakes are applied.

    Not sure the theory behind that though, but as Kwai put it, relined shoes are all the same length linings, so it must not be too important to have a shorter lining up front, just not the short one in back.

  6. #6

    Default

    it has to do with the leading shoes desire to grab an self-energize agianst the drum a shorter lining is best to accomplish this. most often utilized with self adj brake designs manual adj brakes tend to use similar linings although I do know the cj2a (45-49) used a short long lining with the long shoe on front the manual doesnt explain why. For further info visit here: www.cdxetextbook.com/index.html
    68 M-715 MVPA #2710

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Georgetown, CA
    Posts
    418

    Default

    The theory behind the short/long brake shoe is this: the shorter shoe is, theoretically, all that is needed to initiate the self-actuation of both shoes going forward. In reverse, because of slower speeds, there is less self-actuation, so you need more surface area for the same amount of friction. The reason teh CJ-2a is different is because they are not self-actuating brakes, they are anchored, cam-eccentric brakes, so the the theory is much different.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhoadesville, Virginia (five miles from no place)
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    Ahhhhh, now its coming back to me! Thanks for the refresher course!

    The leading shoe helps to apply the other one......

    On old British motorcycles we use Twin Leading Shoe brakes, which have linkage which applies both shoes at the same time mechanically. Until they get very hot, they work quite effectively for a drum brake.

  9. #9

  10. #10

    Default

    after reviewing the manual it dosent mention placement of the primary or secondary shoes- which is why it was covered in the army motors update that is linked by warwick above. I also read a couple things I didnt know such as the anchor block has an arrow on it which must point foward, I wonder if mine are? Ill have to ck them when i do my reline soon. also they instruct that the primary return spring go on first always, and lastly that the brake pedal pivot bolt is an eccentric and adjusts the free play in the brake pedal travel (spec is 1/2 inch). mine does seem ok there. but its apparent i need to reread my manual I have been missing alot of info.
    68 M-715 MVPA #2710

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