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  #11  
Old December 4th, 2017, 06:41 PM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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I appreciate all the help, guys, but I have to make clear that I am NOT going to be doing any tire work on this or any other vehicle, EVER (bicycles being a possible exception). Attempts at motorcycle tire work led me to conclude that I have NO business messing with such things, because I have ZERO patience for it. NONE. Things get thrown. Hard. Heavy things.

Having said that, today I reiterated to the counter guy at GCR my concern that there is FOD between the tire and the tube, and that talc might be a good idea. He said he's going to order a new tube, and we'll start the whole idiotic process over again.

If this repair doesn't hold (and I have no reason to believe it will), I am going to pursue having the wheels modified to run tubeless tires. A guy I know in the resto business up in WY has a source for this, and I am very interested. If it checks out, I'll probably pursue this anyway because I no longer have any confidence in the tube/tire system.

I checked out Stockton Wheel, and if their wheels didn't look so disagreeable, I'd go that route. Still might have to.

Thanks for all the help, everyone. The mystery (AFAIK) persists.
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  #12  
Old December 5th, 2017, 07:35 AM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwai View Post
My guess is you have some debris in the tire that is puncturing the tube after installation. I have seen this happen before. Clean the inside of the tire really really good. then check that the flap is also free of sharp pointy things.

You can get radial tubes from Universal Tire. They are thicker than the bias ply tubes.

I pull the valve core and inflate the tube before installation. Reinstall the valve core after the lock ring is installed.

With a duck bill hammer and two lock ring tools it only takes a few minutes to breakdown a tire and put it back together. You can get the tools from kentool. I use a deadblow hammer to seat the ring. Make sure the joint in the lock ring is 180 degrees opposite the valve stem.


FYI: If the tire hasn't been removed for 50 years it might take a little (lot) longer to get it off the wheel.
I think a prescription pill bottle is tougher to take apart than that wheel at this point: it's seen a lot of action.

Thanks for the tip on tubes; I checked & they have straight rubber valve stems on them which would seem to make them really difficult to fill.

Also, thanks very much for the tire tutorial. As I mentioned above (pardon the rant-- this tire thing and my Summer of Flat Tires has me pretty well fed up with pneumatic tires generally), I shy away from tire work generally, and-- after reading a gorey account of a split rim installation gone wrong elsewhere on the web-- I'm not yet real comfortable with the idea of messing around with split rim wheels.
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  #13  
Old December 5th, 2017, 09:41 AM
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Barrman Barrman is offline
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Because of my past history with flat tires, I have stayed away from commenting on this thread.

However, the split rim thing makes me jump in. The M715 has split lock ring rims. Not split rims. Very big difference.

You have to get a duck billed hammer. Which really is the only way to do it. Oh, when you buy one, get the fiberglass handle. I started off with a wood handle one and have replaced it several times. Thankfully, the local NAPA store has a bin of them like bats in a sporting goods store. They make fun of me every time I walk in and go to the bin.

The duck billed hammer is needed to get the bead of the tire down 1.5-2 inches from the edge of the split ring. The split ring will not come out of its groove no matter how hard you pry until the tire bead is below it. There is no way for the split ring to come off as long as there is a tire on there.

I have had flats at speed going down the interstate, on the trails, over night with the truck sitting, etc... Nothing comes apart until the bead is pushed down a very large distance. On my M35 trucks, I have actually pulled the valve stem core and driven around just to break the bead loose from the split ring so the hammer work will be easier. Don't fear these rims is what I am trying to get across.
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  #14  
Old December 5th, 2017, 02:03 PM
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kwai kwai is offline
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Universal Tire has the correct tubes for our trucks. I just bought 4 in October and mounted them before thanksgiving. Worked fine. They are 900x16 radial tubes with the tr-177A valve stem. part number U71026. $32/each.

These work with the 1100x16 radial tires.

Bob Cowan used to make tubeless wheels using the M715 centers but are I think 8" instead of 6" stock. I have a set and they have worked great.

In the past I have used truck shops to do my tires, because they usually have young knucklehead that can beat the 50 yo tire off the wheel. However, lately I had to do it myself because I can't find anyone nearby that is still working on tube-type wheels/tires.
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  #15  
Old December 6th, 2017, 04:43 AM
farmer farmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailhead View Post
Having said that, today I reiterated to the counter guy at GCR my concern that there is FOD between the tire and the tube, and that talc might be a good idea. He said he's going to order a new tube, and we'll start the whole idiotic process over again.
Don't know what GCR is, but I'd be looking for a new tire guy. Preferable the old school independent shop, or someone that served.

The guy I had do mine was young, but in a old school kind of shop, and was a wrench in the Marine Corp. He was excited to play with something odd he hadn't seen since he was in. He did the disassembly and reassembly, and I ran the wire wheel on the grinder cleaning up the inside of the wheels once they were apart.
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  #16  
Old December 6th, 2017, 07:34 AM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwai View Post
Universal Tire has the correct tubes for our trucks. I just bought 4 in October and mounted them before thanksgiving. Worked fine. They are 900x16 radial tubes with the tr-177A valve stem. part number U71026. $32/each.

These work with the 1100x16 radial tires.

Bob Cowan used to make tubeless wheels using the M715 centers but are I think 8" instead of 6" stock. I have a set and they have worked great.

In the past I have used truck shops to do my tires, because they usually have young knucklehead that can beat the 50 yo tire off the wheel. However, lately I had to do it myself because I can't find anyone nearby that is still working on tube-type wheels/tires.
Misread the tube listings on their website-- thanks.

This wheel has received the last tube it will be getting from me: the tire is fixed with a new tube courtesy GCR and if it goes down again in the near future, I'm going to either wheelsnow.com or Pico Wheel in Chatsworth CA to get the stock wheels rebuilt to run tubeless tires. Probably ought to do that anyway.
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  #17  
Old December 6th, 2017, 07:40 AM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmer View Post
Don't know what GCR is, but I'd be looking for a new tire guy. Preferable the old school independent shop, or someone that served.

The guy I had do mine was young, but in a old school kind of shop, and was a wrench in the Marine Corp. He was excited to play with something odd he hadn't seen since he was in. He did the disassembly and reassembly, and I ran the wire wheel on the grinder cleaning up the inside of the wheels once they were apart.
GCR is the Firestone/Bridgestone national chain of truck/heavy equipment tire shops. They are the only ones I've found around here that will touch what I call split rims.

Trouble is, their techs are young enough to be ignorant of the term "dial-up", and I can't help thinking this is part of the problem I'm having. I doubt they've worked on a carb, set a point gap, or done a valve adjustment, either-- wrong generation.
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  #18  
Old December 6th, 2017, 07:45 AM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrman View Post
Because of my past history with flat tires, I have stayed away from commenting on this thread.

However, the split rim thing makes me jump in. The M715 has split lock ring rims. Not split rims. Very big difference.

You have to get a duck billed hammer. Which really is the only way to do it. Oh, when you buy one, get the fiberglass handle. I started off with a wood handle one and have replaced it several times. Thankfully, the local NAPA store has a bin of them like bats in a sporting goods store. They make fun of me every time I walk in and go to the bin.

The duck billed hammer is needed to get the bead of the tire down 1.5-2 inches from the edge of the split ring. The split ring will not come out of its groove no matter how hard you pry until the tire bead is below it. There is no way for the split ring to come off as long as there is a tire on there.

I have had flats at speed going down the interstate, on the trails, over night with the truck sitting, etc... Nothing comes apart until the bead is pushed down a very large distance. On my M35 trucks, I have actually pulled the valve stem core and driven around just to break the bead loose from the split ring so the hammer work will be easier. Don't fear these rims is what I am trying to get across.
Apologies if my terminology isn't accurate but all semantics aside, if I roll that wheel into a tire shop here in town, the guy at the counter sees "split rim" just before he says "hell no". I might as well be bringing a pistol into an airport.
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  #19  
Old December 6th, 2017, 07:54 AM
Nailhead Nailhead is offline
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Tire is fixed with a complimentary new tube provided by GCR. Got a jack at Harbor Fright, and I'm going to pick up a breaker bar & 1" socket today. This weekend, I'll drive around some back roads & shake it down. I'm not really looking forward to it. I'll update on the outcome.

Thanks everyone for all their insights & happy holidays.
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