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Thread: Wheel Cylinder Conversion

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhoadesville, Virginia (five miles from no place)
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    I love Rock Auto. Unfortunately my checkbook doesn't!
    "Free advice is worth what you pay for it."™

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Greenwood, Indiana
    Posts
    1,656

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    Quote Originally Posted by randyscycle View Post
    I love Rock Auto. Unfortunately my checkbook doesn't!
    Rock Auto loves me too, they get a fair chunk of my hobby budget
    Thanks, George
    Joshua 24:15

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Madison Heights, MI, just outside Detroit
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I know it has been awhile since you posted this. Just wanted to say thanks for the post and the great pics.

    Mike Brink

  4. #34

    Default

    Another possibility for remove the three screws is to drill the heads completely off and pull the drum. This gives good access for WD40 and vise grips. good thread. thanks

  5. #35

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    I use an impact screwdriver...That works best for me...

    Jim

  6. #36

    Default

    We installed the E-350 wheel cylinders in my truck, along with the '74 Corvette MC, and it appears to work great, with a rock-solid pedal at half travel. It has only been driven about 30', so the jury is still out on stopping power.

    One thing we learned in the process of modifying the WC mounting holes is that half a chainsaw file chucked into a drill works really well.

    Thank you very much to all those who had a hand in coming up with this modification.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    North Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,380

    Default

    It has now been found that there are Chevy wheel cylinders that fit the backing plate with no mods at all and connect to the stock brake lines.

    Raybestos numbers for the cylinders are:

    Left-WC9344
    Right-WC9345

    Heres a pic of one in the backing plate:



    THANKS to Kaiserman for figuring this out and posting the part numbers and pic!!
    Lord send your Holy Ghost into our hearts and make the desire of our hearts Your Will.

    Pro-choice, that's a LIE, babies don't choose to die!!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Portlandia, Oregon USA
    Posts
    202

    Default 1.25" bore tho . . .

    Ive been following this in the other thread and I was all excited about this opportunity. I did a quick parts search on line and those part numbers correspond with a 1.25" bore cylinder - so they are bigger than the stock 1-1/16" bore of our stock WC's. Any thoughts on how much that changes the usability of this wheel cylinder in mostly stock or even in modified braking systems??

    Left-WC9344
    Right-WC9345

    Bryce
    1969 M725 ambulance

  9. #39

    Default

    brycer1968,
    It has been a couple of decades since I took a hydraulics course, and my memory isn't as good as it once was, but...

    I think when the wheel/slave cylinder is larger diameter than the master cylinder it will be easier to push the master cylinder.
    This is because the pressure from the master cylinder is spread out over the larger piston diameter of the wheel cylinder.

    The master cylinder will have to travel further to accomplish this, so there is the possibility of running out of stroke in the chosen master cylinder.

    If you go in reverse with a large diameter master cylinder and small diameter wheel cylinders, the stroke will be short, but may require a lot of pedal pressure to actuate the wheel cylinders.

    Please research this before taking my word as gospel, because I could be remembering wrong.
    If anyone knows that I am wrong, please speak up and I will have a moderator remove my post so as not to disseminate false information.
    Roy

  10. #40

    Default

    Another reference would be a bottle jack, or floor jack.

    The pump piston is usually much smaller diameter than the lifting piston.

    The small piston pump will lift a great deal of weight with little effort, but you have to apply quite a few strokes to accomplish the lift.
    Roy

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