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Thread: Electrical Connector Reference

  1. #1

    Default Electrical Connector Reference

    Since I needed to restore my electrical system back to a reasonable resemblance of stock, I knew I would need MS connectors. My truck had the turn signals removed by the PO so wiring harnesses as well as connectors for the switch and flasher was needed. Also, to install the 24 volt igniter, a connector would be needed there also. Since I spent my career in the electrical and electronic industries, I knew MS connectors were available. I would see, from time to time, connectors on e-bay and other sources at double and triple the price of new ones. Because some folks did not know they were common items, they paid the prices.

    So, as a reference, I offer the following connector data for the ‘715 and some other M series vehicles;

    Connectors came in many configurations and are usually bought in pieces and assembled. The shell and insert most often come assembled but not always. Ordering shells by the numbers I provide will give you both components. The cable clamp and/or adapter is another component you need. There are dozens of choices for clamps. The clamps I list are general purpose but are NOT water tight meaning you can not submerge them but they will shed water. You can get water tight ones but at a substantial increase in cost. I don’t know if anyone takes their truck fording but I doubt it. This data may have been posted in the past but a search did not bring this up for me. My apology if this is common knowledge.

    Turn Switch Connector 97-3106A-18-8S ; Clamp 97-3057-1010-1
    Flasher Connector 97-3106A-16-10S ; Clamp 97-3057-1008-1
    Igniter Conector 97-3106A-12-5S ; Clamp 97-3057-1004-1
    3 Lever Light Unknown

    There are many sources of supply at retail and wholesale. Those listed can be found at Mouser.com, Newark.com and Alliedelec.com.

    A picture of one of the wiring harnesses I assembled is below. I hope this info is useful.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhoadesville, Virginia (five miles from no place)
    Posts
    5,125

    Default

    Allied electric used to send a catalog free on request. That thing was over 1000 pages if I remember correctly. They have a lot of stuff.

  3. #3

    Default Thanks.....Good Info

    Good info there.......... It's good to know we can get some "standard" parts at reasonable prices

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Eastern Maine
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Vintage Wiring of Maine has all the connectors and parts, ask for Joe.

  5. #5

    Default 3 Lever Light Comnnector

    Finally found the proper number for the 3 lever light switch connector;

    MS-3106A-28-51S. or may be listed as 97-3106A-28-51S. The 97 series is cheaper. Clamps are many types and available also.
    SFC, HQ,129th Sig Co, PAARNG, Vietnam Era

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Newport News, Va.
    Posts
    297

    Default

    For our home MS prefix Mil Spec plug builders out here reading all this:

    Remember, aircraft connectors (also called "cannon plugs") require a special 3 point indexing crimp tool to connect the pins and sockets to the individual wire leads unless you are going to solder each pin. The crimp tool is EXPENSIVE!!!!!!

    Also, most plug and socket items only come with the exact number of pins. I don't know why, it just is. Over crimp, bend or break a pin during insertion or during removal and you are kind of messed up.

    Removal/insertion of an individual pin from the rubber shell center also requires special insertion and removal tools. This is because each individual little pin is held in place by a compression spring or O clamp. Bust 1 pin compressor and the entire plug is no good. Also insertion tools are either front or rear use depending on the plug. A front insertion/removal tool can not be used on a rear insertion/removal pin set up. 1 cheap plastic Insertion/Removal tool usually comes with a plug and pin assembly but they don't last very long and break easy if you are not gentle with them.

    When inserting the pins, be careful to guide them correctly. Offset a pin in the it's rubber plug isolator hole and it will come out at the other end at a different hole area and then the rubber isolator/locator is shot and the entire plug is shot.

    When cutting and trimming the wires to prep them for pin crimping, care has to be given to the length of each conductor. A conductor in the center of the plug will be a different overall length than one on the outside row or ring. If a wire is too long, it will push the pin right through the plug when you assemble the backshell... too short and it will pull out.

    About those backshell clamps while we are on it... make sure you put that Devil's spawn child on the wire BEFORE you start inserting the pins in the plug isolator. If you don't you have to de-pin the entire plug. Not a fun thing. Take that bit of advise from someone who built a 192 pin and figured it out at the end of pinning. 2 days of work wiped out for nothing.

    During assembly, if you insert a pin in the wrong locator hole, EVERY wire thereafter will be wrong. Identifying which wire goes in locator position capital a ("A") is an utmost requirement. Become familiar with pin locator markings... Pin #1 will always be "A" (Capital letter A) and goes to Capital Z. Then it starts at lower case 'a" to lower case "z". Once again... I'm guilty as charged. Heh heh. also remember the letters "I" and "O" are not used.

    http://www.dmctools.com/default.html Daniels Manufacturing Company has a lot of information about our plugs and how to assemble and disassemble.

    I have a lot of experience with cannon plugs up to and including the 292+ pin plugs (pure hellish nightmare). It was my specialty during my shipyard days and I've destroyed my fair share of them.

    Hope this doesn't scare anyone away from building their own plugs but instead helps out a little.

    All the best-
    Dave
    Last edited by David Zelinski; May 4th, 2015 at 04:58 PM. Reason: more worthless info added :-)
    Even Chuck Norris drove a 715.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by David Zelinski View Post
    For our home MS prefix Mil Spec plug builders out here reading all this:

    Remember, aircraft connectors (also called "cannon plugs") require a special 3 point indexing crimp tool to connect the pins and sockets to the individual wire leads unless you are going to solder each pin. The crimp tool is EXPENSIVE!!!!!!

    Also, most plug and socket items only come with the exact number of pins. I don't know why, it just is. Over crimp, bend or break a pin during insertion or during removal and you are kind of messed up.

    Removal/insertion of an individual pin from the rubber shell center also requires special insertion and removal tools. This is because each individual little pin is held in place by a compression spring or O clamp. Bust 1 pin compressor and the entire plug is no good. Also insertion tools are either front or rear use depending on the plug. A front insertion/removal tool can not be used on a rear insertion/removal pin set up. 1 cheap plastic Insertion/Removal tool usually comes with a plug and pin assembly but they don't last very long and break easy if you are not gentle with them.

    When inserting the pins, be careful to guide them correctly. Offset a pin in the it's rubber plug isolator hole and it will come out at the other end at a different hole area and then the rubber isolator/locator is shot and the entire plug is shot.

    When cutting and trimming the wires to prep them for pin crimping, care has to be given to the length of each conductor. A conductor in the center of the plug will be a different overall length than one on the outside row or ring. If a wire is too long, it will push the pin right through the plug when you assemble the backshell... too short and it will pull out.

    About those backshell clamps while we are on it... make sure you put that Devil's spawn child on the wire BEFORE you start inserting the pins in the plug isolator. If you don't you have to de-pin the entire plug. Not a fun thing. Take that bit of advise from someone who built a 192 pin and figured it out at the end of pinning. 2 days of work wiped out for nothing.

    During assembly, if you insert a pin in the wrong locator hole, EVERY wire thereafter will be wrong. Identifying which wire goes in locator position capital a ("A") is an utmost requirement. Become familiar with pin locator markings... Pin #1 will always be "A" (Capital letter A) and goes to Capital Z. Then it starts at lower case 'a" to lower case "z". Once again... I'm guilty as charged. Heh heh. also remember the letters "I" and "O" are not used.

    http://www.dmctools.com/default.html Daniels Manufacturing Company has a lot of information about our plugs and how to assemble and disassemble.

    I have a lot of experience with cannon plugs up to and including the 292+ pin plugs (pure hellish nightmare). It was my specialty during my shipyard days and I've destroyed my fair share of them.

    Hope this doesn't scare anyone away from building their own plugs but instead helps out a little.

    All the best-
    Dave
    The original equipment, from the factory, did use inserted pins. None of the truck plugs and sockets we listed and use for replacement require insert tools. I know the series you are talking about but the "replacement" 97 series on the vehicles are all solder. Yes, crimping and inserting is a skill, especially if you need to remove one. I have the tools because lots of mil-spec electronics require them.
    SFC, HQ,129th Sig Co, PAARNG, Vietnam Era

  8. #8

    Default

    Do you have a reference source for the waterproof rubber barrel single wire connectors?
    Leave no soldier behind

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