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Thread: split rim tire changing

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Winlock, WA
    Posts
    2,553

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    There is no way you will get the beads over any kind of lip on these rims because the rim is completely flat. Normal car/truck rims have a smaller diameter towards the center of the rim that allows for enough offset of the bead to get it over the lip.

    As for taking these things off. MAN, I spent a long time last night taking about one on a duece rim I need for test fitting my 53's. That sucker has been rusted on the rim for many years!
    Then I am having fun getting these rims to go IN the new tire! Talk about a TIGHT FIT!

  2. #12

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    so then here is my next question do you have to order special tires for the split rings or can you use just a regular tire for them with no problem????
    -brad
    '86 & '98 Ram 4x4's

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    West-central Ohio
    Posts
    685

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    REgulat 16" tires are OK. The inner depression Hammer and the others speak of is th e"well" - the tir ebead has to drop in that 180 degrees away from the bead that is "up-and-over-ing" the rim. The bead ID is 16", the OD of the rim is more - like 18~19 inch - something has to shift to make it work gometrically - that's where the well comes in.

    As for rigging up some sort of bolt-togeher affair - could be done, but this system already works, why bother?

    I do agree that with the ring seated orperly and fully in the groove in the wheel proper, and the tire bead slipped up over the ring "falt fully - the ring can go nowhere. BUT if any one is NOT "fully" or "properly" seated, or there is any significant imperfection - the thing CAN go "BOOM" - be careful, and chain the things together.
    "other peoples junk, is something or other" - Militarypotts 02/07/2011

  4. #14

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    When reassembling the ring, you'll see it snap in hard around the can. It REALLY easy to see if it's not seated. Plus, we're only running 40- pressure, not the 100+psi that big truck tires run.
    Big Blocks RULE!

  5. #15

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    i myself am not messing with these things as there have been documented reports of these things not seating right and maiming guys and or cuting them near in half when they try to air them up to set the bead...
    -brad
    '86 & '98 Ram 4x4's

  6. #16

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    Dude, seriously...that lockring WANTs to stay on. Clean the groove, clean the ring and that sucker snaps in place tough. But, of course...do what you're comfortable with. The last thing we want is for someone to get hurt.
    Big Blocks RULE!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Winlock, WA
    Posts
    2,553

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    It is pretty simple, if the ring's inner lip is not visible, and the bead of the tire is over the ring, IT CAN'T COME OFF. If the bead is not on the ring, then yes, it is still possible for them to come off. Not very likely, but still possible.
    As for safety, it is very simple to just put a chain through the holes on the rim and loop it around the tire, almost like making snow chains. The worst thing would be if it came off with your hand on/near the ring. But remote air valves are easy to use.
    Actually you don't even need one of these, you just need a air chuck that clips/locks/screws on. Most of us have air compressors with a pressure gauge and some type of bleed valve to keep the output at an easily adjusted pressure. Just hook the air chuck up, stand back and let it start airing up. Once the bead is over the ring, you are home safe and you don't need to turn it off remotely.
    I have done WAY to many of these while in the army on the dueces I had to drive. And if you know much about 'some' military mechanics, there are some really 'dull tools' in the bunch. I think that most of these accidents occur because of cranial rectal inversion. Hell, even the stupid ones in my motorpool never had an accident!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    West-central Ohio
    Posts
    685

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    I can dig your reticence. If you are not comfortable with it, you have no business pushing yourself into it. I feel comfortable with it (with chains), some feel more comfortable with it so much so they don't use safety stuff. It all boils down to your comfort level with the task at hand. I trust the mechanics of the operation, just not so much so the state of repair some wheels may be in. Rusted/pitted /worn rings or cans - I recommend caution, especially to a guy I know nothing about or materials I have not inspected.

    True - the design of the system is such that when the ring is seated and the bead is seated thereto - all is secure.

    It's like the old question of "I'm putting a late-model engine in my XXX. Should I keep the fuel injection or slap on a carburetor?" Well, thos guys that are knowledgable and confident with their skills around EFI would think it daft to go "old-school" with a carburetor - they'd love the benefits of EFI - BUT there's ALWAYS gonna be a guy without a clue of how EFI works, and would forever be "rasslin" with it - for those guys, a carburetor makes more sense. Same thing with these wheels - those guys that are "down wid 'em" can mount 'em all day. The first time a guy with any level of doubt in his mind attacks one - disaster may soon follow. In both cases, you need to know how each system works and be comfortable with it for a successful day.

    I will not say that the split-ring system is foolprooof and totally safe.
    "other peoples junk, is something or other" - Militarypotts 02/07/2011

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Winlock, WA
    Posts
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    Well put!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Montreal Canada
    Posts
    23

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    The best quote on the subject was...
    "These things were never designed to maim and kill people. They were designed to hold the tire on the rim and that is just what they do. Injuries were usually caused by dull and repeditive work like changing 10 tires on a deuce, where one gets a little careless at the end of a day"
    This was from a retired airforce mechanic found on the web.
    It actually gave me the incentive to try.

    I changed the spare on Tuesday. That one was a real of a job! The tire was marked 1969 and had never been run. It still had all the rubber flashing and little nubs on it. unfortunatly it was cracked to hell.
    Anyway I ended up using the jaws of life to break the bead. even that I had a rough time of it and punctured the sidewall.
    Next is the m101 trailer Those probably been there since 53!

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